Fire and Clay

By: William Lycholaj

Clay has a history reaching back thousands of years, and up until recently all of that clay was fired in the heat of a flame. With the advent of electric kilns, potters no longer had to tend the kiln for eight to ten hours; firing clay became as easy as pushing a button. There is nothing wrong with that, and people still get beautiful results from electric kilns; however, the interplay between the fire and clay is missing from the electric process. That interplay, that infernal caress, can create inconsistencies in the uniformity of the glaze; but sometimes, the little inconsistencies make the most beautiful moments.

These are some of my pieces from Keystone’s most recent gas kiln firing:

Untitled 12″x 7″ Ceramic and Shino Glaze, Cone 10

 

Untitled 13″x 9″ Ceramic and Glaze, Cone 10

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Untitled 13.5″x 9″ Ceramic and Shino Glaze, Cone 10

 

Untitled 3.5″x 4.5″ Ceramic and Shino Glaze, Cone 10

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Untitled 3.25″x 4.5″ Ceramic and Shino Glaze, Cone 10

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Untitled 3.5″x 5″ Ceramic and Shino Glaze, Cone 10

 

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